Daniel Goode

Composer & Performer

Category: Open Letter

A Kind Note From Composer Noah Creshevsky

From: Noah Creshevsky
Date: February 29, 2016 2:14:55 PM EST
To: Daniel Goode
Subject: Your clarinet quintet

Dear Daniel,

That is such a beautiful piece–written on a quite large scale, technically assured, expressive, and–yes, a rare word–inspired!

I had great pleasure hearing it now. Thank you for posting it.

My best to you,
Noah

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A Response to a Kind Letter

Hey, Very thoughtful writing, yet again, it would have been a fine night of being surrounded by profound sound, I imagine. Maybe it was the amount of acoustical vibration that got everyone so excited? (Not that there’s any other kind of vibration – but that is a special place to listen.) -g
                                                                          ~composer, Gayle Young, Toronto

I agree. The vibrational thing over-ruled the exact musical thing. Also, I didn’t mention the off-stage trumpets at two points, and the off-stage trombones (which I never located), but were in balconies above the audience. And also making vibrational geschrei was the organ, at key points. The very first sound is a giant Eb major chord from the organ, an instant before you here the first instrumental entries. It switches you instantly into a different mode of listening. I also didn’t say in the essay, but mentioned to Ann that visual grandeur (= the sublime, in some quarters) like a huge cathedral, and auditory grandeur as in a huge orchestra and chorus have different needs: like a really great concert hall in the latter. So I wasn’t exactly a happy camper at St. John’s, but registered it as a moment of the “sublime” in experiential terms, probably for much of the audience. And cheered for that. The great church organist composers (Bach and others) did make both visual and auditory grandeur in the same place. But Mahler symphonies need different acoustics.

Thanks for your comments. Definitely adds to what I felt was going on, but didn’t really have the words for.

-Daniel

Offer to the Vatican: Critical Mass

I would like to offer to the Vatican at no charge, the lyrics to my 2007 musical composition, Critical Mass. Here they are:

CRITICAL MASS, parts I & II                 text by Daniel Goode

I.
A spector is haunting America, a spirit is haunting America, a spirit of secular joy, of peace and community, enough for all, a spirit for us to enjoy.
Non credo in deo, non credo.
Oo-hoo-hoo a-ha-ha oo-hoo-hoo a-ha hoo-hoo-hoo ha-ha-ha hoo-hoo-hoo ha-ha.
Non credo in deo, non credo, non credo.
Oo-hoo-hoo a-ha-ha oo-hoo-hoo a-ha hoo-hoo-hoo ha-ha-ha hoo-hoo-hoo ha-ha.
Non credo, non credo, non credo, non credo.
Hoo ha ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha Hoo ha. Non credo in deo, no, no, no!
“Credo in us.” Thank you, John Cage! Credo in us!
A spector is haunting America. “[A]merica.” Thank-a-you, Lenny Bernstein. A spirit is haunting America, a spirit of secular joy. Joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, joy, j, j, j, j, j, j, j, j, j, j, j, j, oooo! a spirit of sexual joy, sec, sec, sec, sec, sec, se-cuh-la, se-cuh-la, se-cuh-la, se-cuh-la, oooo!
Non credo in deo, non credo. No, no, no!
A mass for us, a mass for all, for us, for peace and community, planet, our home. Non credo, non credo in deo, non credo, non credo in deo. O, O. Let’s meditate. Open the gate! For all, for us. Thank you, Pauline.* Sing any note, open your throat! Ah… Ah… Ah… Say any thing, then make it sing! Open your throat! Sing any note. Ah……

II.
We believe in We believe in We believe in We—oo-ahh-ee-oo-ahh. Non non non credo-do-do-do-do-do, non credo in deo—ahh-oo-ee-ahh-oo.
We believe in We believe in We believe in We.
The suffering’s real, but death you don’t feel, shed your fears, then your tears, we are here, so are you, dear.
They say they speak in tongues, then why do they support the guns? We’ll show them where we put our tongues: aye-ee, ee-oh, you-ee, oh-aye, oh-wah, oh wah, ya-you, wah-ee.
It’s guns that kill people, not people, not people, it’s guns that kill people plus people plus people, oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo. People plus people plus guns that kill people, it’s people plus people plus bombs that kill people. It’s guns, put them down!—oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo. Thank you, Meredith Monk, oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo.
Now it’s your turn to thank some one, come on! come on! come on! come on! Thank some one! Thank some one!—oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo-ah-oo. Thank some one on any note…
The suffering’s real, but death you don’t feel, shed your fears, then your tears, we are here, so are you, dear.
Endlessness forever is all we can divine. If that’s divine, that’s fine.
We are alone with each other, there is no other. If that’s divine, that’s fine.
Love, then experience, then: make the world a better place to live. That’s where we live and thrive.
There is no proof that any one has ever gone to heaven or hell.
Faith, they say, is proof, but to them we say: oh poof, oh poof! Oh poof, oh poof, poof poof poof poof poof poof poof poof poof poof poof.
Air is divine. In and out, breath! Air is divine, is fine, is fine.
Let in the thought of what is sought. Hm, hm, hm, hm.
Bring on the dance, let in the trance-ce-ce-ce-ce. Bring on the dance, let in the trance-ce-ce-ce-ce. Let in the trance, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce. ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce, ce.

* “Pauline” is composer, Pauline Oliveros who composed Sonic Meditations
c 2005 by Daniel Goode

Open Letter to Dean Rosenthal

Below is my letter to Dean Rosenthal, composer, a follow-up to my post about Tom Johnson’s new book, Other Harmony:

Well, I think my non-review was really quite simple-minded. Yes, the important issues were raised in very basic terms. But the incredible interweaving of intellect, feeling, aesthetic standards, not to mention history and tradition is very hard to get beyond, thus we have to write theory books, and have to compose (I hate to say write, that’s the nub of it—writing is what we do when we compose, but composing is not about writing).

I see the two poles of minimalism as being something like: trance-music vs. systems music. Minimalism spawned both at the same time. The “counting pieces” of Charlie Morrow (no, never Tom) were in the trance music direction, as much as Tom’s were in the systems direction. True, Tom, if you pressed him, would grant the theatrical reality of the performance, but I never felt he would admit the Dionysian reality of repetition. Freud was certainly correct in trying to incorporate both in his “Id, ego, superego” trio, completely condemned as unscientific by all future scientists of the field. But essentially he was right to “square the circle.” The incorporation of drugs into music was basically an admission that music and intoxication were brother/sisters, and everyone knew that. The early music of Glass and Reich, and many OTHERS was essentially trance music. People in my circle vacillated about trance and system, or tried to just avoid the issue by keeping to technical ground, historical precedent or whatever. But everyone knew that minimalism was “dangerous.” I was fired at Rutgers for practicing “minimal music requiring minimal preparation” by the Harvard trained head of the Rutgers Music Department. (BTW I won my grievance and got tenure because of this man’s dumb move of putting that phrase in writing. Choice of style was sacrosanct even in the academy: it was FREEDOM of SPEECH!)

But he, the head of the tenure committee, knew minimalism was “dangerous.” He even was smart enough to say that it went one step beyond Satie (=repetition) by adding trance. You have to give Wagner credit for knowing that intellect and trance or “swooning” or being transported (as in Dionysian frenzy) had to be combined to get a really great art. (Of course not every piece has to be a masterpiece of swooning logic! What about some little ditty like “This old man, this old man…”).

Even Cage understood, but couched it in kind pseudo-zen: if something is boring, do it for 4 hours. If it’s still boring do it for 8 hours, etc. The music world would never admit into music this Zen saying, either before, during or after minimalism. And I can agree that pure trance without music is not as satisfying as with. Zen was never about artistic satisfaction, or even bodily satisfaction.

My non-review of Tom Johnson’s book also didn’t take on its content. And as of when I wrote my non-review, I still haven’t finished it, though I’ve skimmed ahead to see where it’s going. An actual review of Tom’s book in its own terms would have to be by someone other than me. There probably already is one someplace in the academy.

You [Dean Rosenthal] are the only one who responded to my request for comments, except for Phil Corner who sent me a set of beautiful calligraphic scores. And I wrote back to him this:

‘Your beautiful scores say here and there: “no redeeming musical value.” This seems to buffer you from being thought “music” if it’s “theory” and theory if it’s thought to be music, so you get out of it free—of the controversy. Yes? No?’ He said that was very well put!